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anthrbookjunkie

anthrbookjunkie

The Way We Fall - Megan Crewe The Way We Fall is a fascinating read, in a strange way. The story is told through a series of letters from Kaelyn to her friend, Leo. It felt strange, because it was too formal and at times too much like traditional prose to feel like it was actually letters to her friend. The writing seems to be caught between the two—letter form and traditional writing, and it was very slow moving. It did have a simplicity that left a lot to the imagination, and gave the book a sort of darkness that made it feel very unique. While I can appreciate what this format accomplishes, I can’t say I was a fan of it. Much of the action is told after the fact, so there was a bit of a disconnect. I felt it lacked a lot of suspense that it had potential for.The Way We Fall is also unique in its timing. In most of the recent dystopian/science fiction novels I’ve read, the story starts well after the initial outbreak. The Way We Fall starts before the outbreak, and you see the panic start to set in as the situation gets worse. You’re actually inside the head of a teenage girl who watches as the people around her slowly die off and her community goes into panic mode. It was different and I liked that.I can’t say I really cared for the characters. I never felt like I got to know Kaelyn. Even her physical appearance is a complete mystery to me. She mentions a few times about her parents being different colors, but that doesn’t tell me anything really, not to mention the lack of detail in that makes it impossible for me to imagine her parents’ faces. I didn’t really get to know anyone around her. So when sad things happen, I didn’t really feel for her because I didn’t know any of the characters well enough to care. And Leo’s role was much smaller than I anticipated, and it made the whole letter format seem even more pointless.The Way We Fall has an interesting premise, and I may have loved if it had been written differently, and if there had been more depth to the secondary characters. But overall, it is definitely fascinating and I may read the sequel if it isn’t written as a series of “letters”.