9 Followers
25 Following
anthrbookjunkie

anthrbookjunkie

The Selection (The Selection, #1)

The Selection (The Selection, #1) - Kiera Cass 1.5 For some reason that I cannot figure out, I wanted to read The Selection. The Bachelor meets Hunger Games, they promised, both of which I disliked. Why…I don’t know myself very well, apparently.I’m sure everyone is aware of the drama surrounding The Selection, but I still had to read it for myself. I was tempted to just write it off, but I had to know the story. I had to form my own opinion. I thought I would like something about it. I mean, aside from the negative reviews that people continue to whine about, there are a lot of positive reviews. Friends with similar tastes to mine loved it. Did I expect to love it? No. But I did expect to find it tolerable. To my surprise, I wanted to bang my head against the wall continuously, and it’s some sort of miracle that I managed to finish it.I would not consider The Selection a dystopian. If anything, it seems historical with a dash of modern technology. Nothing about this book felt futuristic. The only thing that even felt modern was the fact that they had a television and vehicles. The caste system is sketchy. Very sketchy. America is a five, which apparently consists of artists of varying kinds. An entire caste consists of artists. Artistic talent may not be rare, but there is absolutely no way to guarantee that every child born to an artist will be an artist. In fact, it is highly unlikely. I don’t recall seeing what casts 4-2 did for a living, but everything below a 5 was a servant of some sort. It just didn’t seem believable by any stretch. Lower castes also tend to have a lot more children, and America says they can’t regulate their families like upper castes. Any time anyone says something like that (in a book or in real life) I want to slap them. (I want to but I don't do it. I'm looking at you America.) There is one way you’re going to get pregnant, and if you want to prevent pregnancy badly enough, don’t do it. I was indifferent to both Aspen and Prince Maxon. Neither of them did or said anything to make me care which of them she ends up with. America is of course the most beautiful, selfless girl in all the land. Her beauty is mentioned consistently throughout the story, giving America numerous opportunities to shun it and show us just how modest she is. Except, selfless she is not. She could have taken this opportunity to help her family in the beginning, but that was never her priority. She signed up to ease her boyfriend’s mind, and so her mother will stop bothering her about it. It was never because her family could use the money, until she was in the palace, and even then, it was just as much the fact that she didn’t want to see certain people and going home would force her to see them again. I disliked the storyline, the characters, the world. But I didn’t hate any of it, aside from one thing. That was it. I slapped him. "You idiot!" I whisper-yelled at him. "I hate him! I loved you! I wanted you; all I ever wanted was you!"Pause. I'm ignoring the whisper-yell. I don't even care about that at this point. Why is it okay for females to slap male characters? If she had been pissing him off and he slapped her, it would be the end of the world, and it most likely would not have been published that way. Abuse is abuse. A female slapping a male is no better than a male slapping a female. It is not okay. It is not acceptable to me. It makes me detest you immediately. I think it was that moment that I knew I was going to hate this book. It is somehow supposed to be empowering? Should we get a sense of female empowerment through violence? Funny thing, that. In a world where the women are nothing but items for the Prince to use at his discretion, the only moment of empowerment comes from her slapping him. I should have stopped there.